NEW RULES RAISING THE AGE LIMIT UNTIL A CHILD IS REGARDED AS DEPENDENT

NEW RULES RAISING THE AGE LIMIT UNTIL A CHILD IS REGARDED AS DEPENDENT.

The Government of Canada has changed the definition of the age of dependants from “under 19” to “under 22,” fulfilling a key mandate commitment of the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship. This change will help more immigrant families stay together.  Under the new rules, children are still perceived as dependents beyond the age of 22 if they rely on their parents’ support due to physical or mental disabilities.  However, the new rules have not reactivated the old provision according to which they remain dependents until they finish their studies.

This change applies to all new applications received by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) on or after October 24, 2017.

To help even more families stay together, the government has introduced a public policy that would allow for the addition or sponsorship of some children whose parents had existing applications in process on May 3, 2017, or who have applied since that time.  Based on public policy consideration sa permanent residence application for a child can be made if the:

  1. Child was 19, 20, or 21 as of May 3, 2017 (the date of final publication of the regulatory amendment) or as of date the parent’s permanent residence application was made, if received on or after May 3, 2017 and before October 24, 2017;
  2. Parent or child had a permanent residence application that was either pending on May 3, 2017 or was received on or after May 3, 2017 and before October 24, 2017 (the child must have been previously identified as “additional family” on their parent’s application);
  3. Child is not a spouse/common-law partner; and,
  4. Child is not otherwise inadmissible.

The child can be:

  1. Processed or added to an application (as a dependent child) if the permanent resident visa or Confirmation of Permanent Residence (COPR) had not been issued at the time the Department was notified of the intention to add the child; OR
  2. Sponsored as a member of the Family Class once the parent is granted permanent residence.

Refugees and protected persons may add a child who was 19, 20, or 21 on May 3, 2017 and (not a spouse/common-law partner) as an accompanying or non-accompanying dependant on a pending application; non-accompanying dependants would be able to apply for permanent residence within the one-year window.

An application to sponsor a child who is eligible under this public and is 22 or over at time of sponsorship, must be received by the Department within one year after their parent is granted permanent residence. Children who are under 22 at time of sponsorship will be processed under the regular sponsorship regulations.

Parents who wish to apply for their child to come to Canada must notify the Department of their intention to do so by January 31, 2018, in accordance with instructions provided by the department.

For the purposes of this public policy, an application is considered to be pending up until the applicant’s departure for Canada if they are outside Canada OR until permanent residence has been granted if the applicant is in Canada.

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Government of Canada implements new legislative changes to the Citizenship Act

Government of Canada implements new legislative changes to the Citizenship Act

October 4, 2017 – Ottawa, ON – As part of the Government of Canada’s commitment to provide greater flexibility in meeting requirements for those who wish to obtain Canadian citizenship, the Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, announced today a significant milestone in implementing changes to the Citizenship Act through the adoption of Bill C-6.

Changes to take effect as of October 11, 2017
Previous Citizenship Act Citizenship Act with Bill C-6 Amendments
Applicants had to be physically present in Canada for four out of six years before applying for citizenship. Applicants must be physically present in Canada for three out of five years before applying for citizenship.
Applicants had to file Canadian income taxes, if required to do so under the Income Tax Act, for four out of six years, matching the physical presence requirement. Applicants must file Canadian income taxes, if required to do so under the Income Tax Act, for three out of five years, matching the new physical presence requirement.
Applicants had to be physically present in Canada for 183 days in four out of the six years preceding their application. This provision is repealed. Applicants no longer have to meet this requirement.
Time spent in Canada prior to becoming a permanent resident did not count towards the physical presence requirement for citizenship. Applicants may count each day they were physically present in Canada as a temporary resident or protected person, before becoming a permanent resident, as a half-day toward meeting the physical presence requirement for citizenship, up to a maximum credit of 365 days, within five years preceding the date of application.
Applicants between 14 and 64 years had to meet the language and knowledge requirements for citizenship. Applicants between 18 and 54 years must meet the language and knowledge requirements for citizenship.

 

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SECOND ROUND OF APPLICATION INTAKE

PARENTS AND GRANDPARENTS: SECOND ROUND OF APPLICATION INTAKE

(from the IRCC website)

Ottawa, September 1, 2017— This year, the Government of Canada introduced a new application intake process for the Parents and Grandparents Program. This change improves access to the application process and makes it more fair and transparent.

Under this new process, people who want to sponsor their parents and grandparents to come to Canada first have to complete an online form. Earlier this year, 10,000 individuals were randomly selected from the forms received and invited to submit an application to sponsor their parents and grandparents. They were given 90 calendar days to submit their applications, meaning that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) needed to receive complete applications by August 4, 2017.

IRCC did not receive 10,000 complete applications by August 4, 2017. A second round of emails will be sent to invite additional potential sponsors to submit an application. These additional potential sponsors will be selected using the same randomized list that was prepared to identify the first 10,000 potential sponsors invited to submit an application.

Emails will be sent to the additional potential sponsors inviting them to submit an application to sponsor their parents and grandparents. These potential sponsors will have until December 8, 2017, to submit their complete sponsorship applications to IRCC. The second round of invitations will mean a second chance for many potential sponsors who were not invited in the first round.

The potential sponsors who were invited in the first round, but did not submit applications, will not have another chance to apply in 2017.

Those who are not selected to submit applications in 2017 will have the opportunity to show their interest to sponsor their parents and grandparents again in early 2018.

It is important to note that:

  • invitations will be sent to potential sponsors beginning on September 6, 2017
  • this process will continue over a few days. Check your email and junk mail carefully throughout that week
  • in this second round of invitations, only those who have been randomly selected to submit an application will receive an email

As of September 6, potential sponsors can confirm whether or not they have been selected by looking up their unique Confirmation Number to compare it with the list of numbers that were randomly selected.

  • if their number appears, they have been invited to submit their sponsorship application
  • if their number doesn’t appear, they have not been selected

If potential sponsors are not sure what their unique confirmation number is, and want to confirm whether or not they were selected to submit an application, they can complete the Check If You Were Selected web form – we’ll respond to potential sponsors within 10 business days to let them know if they were selected or not.

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Citizenship Bill Receives Royal Assent

Citizenship Bill Receives Royal Assent

As of June 19, 2017, applicants are no longer required to intend to continue to live in Canada once granted citizenship, providing more flexibility to Canadians who may need to live outside of Canada for work or personal reasons. Immediate changes also include repealing the ability to revoke citizenship from dual citizens convicted of crimes against the national interest. Dual citizens living in Canada who are convicted of these crimes will face the Canadian justice system, like other Canadian citizens who break the law.

Some of the changes that are expected to take effect later this fall will give more flexibility to both younger and older eligible immigrants to obtain citizenship. These changes include reducing the time permanent residents must be physically present in Canada to three out of five years, instead of four out of six years, before applying for citizenship; amending the age range for people to meet the language and knowledge requirements for citizenship from 14-64 years to 18-54 years; and counting some of the time applicants spend in Canada as temporary residents or protected persons toward their physical presence requirements for citizenship.

Other changes that are expected to take effect next year include strengthening the citizenship revocation process by having the Federal Court as the decision-maker on most cases, thereby enhancing the procedural fairness of the process. See below a complete list of changes made to the Citizenship Act and when they take effect:

Changes that take effect immediately upon Royal Assent on June 19, 2017

Previous Citizenship Act Citizenship Act with Bill C-6 Amendments
Citizenship could be revoked from dual citizens convicted of treason, spying and terrorism offences, depending on the sentence received, or who were a part of an armed force of a country or organized group engaged in conflict with Canada. This provision is repealed. Dual citizens living in Canada who are convicted of these crimes will face the Canadian justice system, like other Canadian citizens who break the law.
Applicants were required to intend to continue to live in Canada if granted citizenship. This provision is repealed. Applicants are no longer required to intend to continue to live in Canada once granted citizenship. This provides more flexibility to Canadians who may need to live outside of Canada for work or personal reasons.
The Minister had the discretion to waive certain requirements under subsection 5(1) of the Citizenship Act so a minor could obtain citizenship without a Canadian parent. Minors can now apply for citizenship without a Canadian parent, as the age requirement for citizenship has been removed under subsection 5(1). A person having custody of the minor or empowered to act on their behalf by court order, written agreement or operation of law, can now apply for citizenship on behalf of the minor, unless that requirement is waived by the Minister.
No provision existed to prevent individuals serving a sentence in the community (a conditional sentence order) from being granted citizenship, taking the Oath of Citizenship or counting this time towards meeting the physical presence requirements for citizenship. Individuals serving a conditional sentence will not be granted citizenship, take the Oath of Citizenship, or be able to count this time towards meeting the physical presence requirements for citizenship.
The Minister has the discretion to grant citizenship to a person to alleviate cases of special and unusual hardship, or to reward services of an exceptional value to Canada. Statelessness has been added as a stand-alone ground that can be considered for a discretionary grant of citizenship.
The Department has reasonable measures to accommodate the needs of citizenship applicants. However, there was no explicit reference to accommodate persons with disabilities in the Citizenship Act. The requirement to take into consideration reasonable measures to accommodate the needs of a citizenship applicant who is a disabled person is now included in the Citizenship Act.
The requirement for applicants to maintain the requirements for citizenship from the time they apply for citizenship until taking the Oath of Citizenship only applied to applications received on or after June 11, 2015. This requirement now also applies to all applications, including those received before June 11, 2015.

Changes expected to take effect in fall 2017

Previous Citizenship Act Citizenship Act with Bill C-6 Amendments
Applicants had to be physically present in Canada for four out of six years before applying for citizenship. Applicants must be physically present in Canada for three out of five years before applying for citizenship.
Applicants had to file Canadian income taxes, if required to do so under the Income Tax Act, for four out of six years, matching the physical presence requirement. Applicants must file Canadian income taxes, if required to do so under the Income Tax Act, for three out of five years, matching the new physical presence requirement.
Applicants had to be physically present in Canada for 183 days in four out of the six years preceding their application. This provision is repealed. Applicants no longer have to meet this requirement.
Time spent in Canada prior to becoming a permanent resident did not count towards the physical presence requirement for citizenship. Applicants may count each day they were physically present in Canada as a temporary resident or protected person before becoming a permanent resident as a half-day toward meeting the physical presence requirement for citizenship, up to a maximum credit of 365 days.
Applicants between 14 and 64 years had to meet the language and knowledge requirements for citizenship. Applicants between 18 and 54 years must meet the language and knowledge requirements for citizenship.

 Changes expected to take effect in early 2018

Previous Citizenship Act Citizenship Act with Bill C-6 Amendments
The Minister was the decision-maker for most cases of citizenship revocation on the grounds of false representation, fraud, or knowingly concealing material circumstances. The Federal Court was the decision-maker for citizenship revocation cases involving false representation, fraud, or knowingly concealing material circumstances related to security, human or international right violations, and organized criminality. The Federal Court is the decision-maker in all revocation cases, unless the individual requests that the Minister make the decision.
There was no clear authority for Citizenship Officers to seize fraudulent or suspected fraudulent documents provided under the Citizenship Act. Clear authority for Citizenship Officers to seize fraudulent or suspected fraudulent documents is provided under the Citizenship Act.

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SPRING 2017: IMMIGRATION NEWS

SPRING 2017: IMMIGRATION NEWS

At the end of March 2017, IRCC (Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada) and MIDI Quebec (Ministère de l’Immigration, de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion) have announced important steps concerning both the Quebec selection system and the  federal Express Entry (EE) procedures.

MIDI published on March 30, 2017. a Decision on registration of new applications for this year, which seems essentially to keep the way “Mon projet Quebec” works unchanged. It indicates that 5,000 new applications will be accepted starting from a date to be announced later, without any mention  about the coming into force of the system based on declarations of intent that was announced two years ago. In other words, until further notice, we expect the new applications to be accepted on the old “first come, first served” system, with the result that the above mentioned cap will be completed in a few seconds at the starting date of the operation, the way it happened twice in 2016.  It should be noted that the 5000 cap will not  affect the applications submitted under the PEQ (Program de l’expérience Québécoise), or those filed by candidates who have validated job offers or  are actually in Quebec as students or temporary workers. The same decision maintains the suspension concerning the receipt of applications   in the “entrepreneurs” and “travailleurs autonomes” categories.  As regards the investors, it sets a cap of 1900 applications, out of which only 1330 can be filed by  Chinese businessmen.

On 31 March 2017 it was the turn of the Federal Government to reform the Express Entry system.  I would like to remind our readers  that in late 2016 IRCC implemented a  first major change that drastically diminished,  from 600 to 50, the extra points awarded to  holders of LMIA based work permits or of validated  job offers (except only for the senior management positions  who get 200). Shortly thereafter, the minimum score for which IRPA issued ITAs (Invitations to Apply) began to gradually decline, reaching  441points at the last draw.

The new change comes into force on June the 1st 2017 and will introduce two important measures: it will provide additional points to candidates fluent in French and to those who have brothers / sisters permanent residents or Canadian citizens. Thus, it will add 15 points to the score of the candidates who have demonstrated by the TEF test a minimum level 7 of language skills in French according to the CLB (Canadian Language Benchmarks) and a maximum level of 4 for English. In the event that the level of English is at least five, the score will increase with 30 points.  As regards the Canadian siblings, it is interesting to observe that no points are allocated for parents or uncles/aunts, despite the fact that they are still adding points to their relatives under the Federal Skilled Worker Program.  Consequently, starting from June 1, 2017 only the candidates who share at least one parent with a Canadian citizen or resident permanent aged at least 18 will receive 15 additional points.

Let us not forget also that the francophones can also enjoy easier immigration to Canada under the  Ontario’s Express Entry French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream.

Dan Gheciu

 

 

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ONTARIO HAS RESUMED ACCEPTING NEW APPLICATIONS

ONTARIO HAS RESUMED ACCEPTING NEW APPLICATIONS

Ontario is continuing to help businesses attract the talented people they need to compete globally by accepting more skilled newcomers than ever before through its successful Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP).

Recognizing the success of the OINP and its importance to Ontario’s economy, the federal government has increased the province’s 2017 allocation by 500 nominees to a total of 6,000. Through the OINP, Ontario is able to nominate people for permanent resident status. Nominees include skilled workers, international students, experienced entrepreneurs, and key staff of established foreign corporations seeking to expand into Ontario.

On February 21, 2017 the OINP  opened applications for its three highest-volume streams – the International Masters Graduate Stream, the International PhD Graduate Stream, and the Ontario Express Entry Human Capital Priorities Stream.  It has also continued to accept applications under the Ontario’s Express Entry French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream.

The quota allocated to the first two above-mentioned streams had been completed in a matter of days.  The streams will re-open after May 1st 2017.  To ensure processing efficiency and quality customer service, the OINP is monitoring the volume of applications to the International Masters Graduate, International PhD Graduate, and Ontario’s Express Entry Human Capital Priorities streams throughout the year.  These streams will be paused and reopened periodically until the province’s 2017 federal allocation is fulfilled.  Stakeholders will be informed when streams are temporarily paused and reopened via the OINP Updates page.

As regards the streams connected to the federal Express Entry system, a nomination by the Province of Ontario will bring to each candidate a plus of 600 points that guarantees the issuance of an Invitation to Apply (ITA) at the very next round of invitations.

The OINP has also modernizing its application process this year with a new, paperless online system, which will speed up the application process, improve customer service, and help employers find the skilled workers they need sooner.

 

 

 

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FALL 2016: MAJOR CHANGES TO THE EXPRESS ENTRY SYSTEM TO COME INTO FORCE

FALL 2016: MAJOR CHANGES TO THE EXPRESS ENTRY SYSTEM TO COME INTO FORCE

Before November 19, 2016

Job offers

The Express Entry Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) awards 600 points for a job that is permanent and is supported by a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA).

Education

The Express Entry system only awards points for education overall as long as it has been assessed as equivalent to a Canadian standard.

No additional benefit is awarded specifically to former international students who have received an education in Canada.

Applications

After receiving an invitation to apply, candidates have 60 days to submit a complete application for permanent residence. This includes all documentation such as police certificates and medical exams.

After November 19, 2016

Job offers

On November 19, 2016, the points awarded by the CRS for a job offer will change in three ways:

Points will be awarded for job offers of eligible candidates here on LMIA exempt work permits.

Many people in Canada temporarily on an employer specific LMIA-exempt work permit, but who want to stay in Canada permanently, will no longer need to get an LMIA to be awarded job offer points by the CRS. This includes candidates who are here under the North America Free Trade Agreement, a federal-provincial agreement, Mobilité Francophone, or who are intra-company transferees. The candidates must meet certain criteria, such as at least one year of work experience from the same employer who is providing their job offer.

Job offers will only need to be a minimum of one year in duration once they receive permanent residence.

By changing the job offer requirement from permanent to one year means that more highly skilled candidates working in contract-based industries will have a higher likelihood of receiving an invitation to apply for permanent residence.

Points awarded for job offers will be reduced.

A total of 50 points will be awarded to candidates with a valid job offer in a National Occupational Classification (NOC) 0, A or B occupation, while a total of 200 points will be awarded to candidates with a valid job offer in a NOC 00 occupation.

The number of points awarded for a job offer, often made it hard for highly skilled candidates without job offers to get an invitation to apply. This change means Canada will now welcome more highly skilled candidates whose skills and experience will help support and grow our economy.

The change in points for job offers will now also better recognize the skills and experience required for the job, together with the value that it brings to the economy.

Education

On November 19, 2016, points will be awarded by the CRS for education obtained in Canada in the following way:

Points will be awarded for study in Canada above high school.

The CRS will award 15 points for a one- or two-year diploma or certificate and 30 points for a degree, diploma or certificate of three years or longer including a Master’s, professional or doctoral degree.

With these changes, more former international students will be able to transition to permanent residence using the Express Entry system. Former international students are a key source of candidates in Express Entry because of their age, education, skills and experience. In addition to the time already spent in Canada, integrating into Canadian society permanently will be easier because they will have established social networks and familiarized themselves with life in Canada.

Applications

On November 19, 2016, applications will be treated in the following way:

Candidates will have 90 days to complete an application for permanent residence if they get an invitation to apply. This will give candidates more time to gather all the required documentation and submit a complete application.

It is to be noted that the new rules have not touched the 600 points a candidate receives if he/she is issued with a nomination certificate from a Canadian province (except for Quebec).  One might also note that the IRCC did not include in these new rules any points to be awarded for candidates who have close relatives in Canada, as heralded when the Liberals won the last elections.

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ROMANIANS AND BULGARIANS WILL TRAVEL TO CANADA VISA-FREE ON DECEMBER 1, 2017

Canada announces its intention to allow all Romanians and Bulgarians to travel to Canada visa-free on December 1, 2017

October 31, 2016 — Ottawa, Ontario – The Honourable John McCallum, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, announced today the Government of Canada’s intention to lift the visa requirements for Romanian and Bulgarian citizens on December 1, 2017. It demonstrates the importance that the Government of Canada places on its relationship with both countries and with the EU more broadly.

In the lead-up to the full visa lifts, Canada intends to implement partial lifts for eligible Romanian and Bulgarian citizens travelling to Canada for May 1, 2017. Romanian and Bulgarian citizens who have held a Canadian temporary resident visa in the past 10 years or who currently hold a valid United States (U.S.) non-immigrant visa would not require a temporary resident visa and would be able to fly to or transit through Canada with an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) instead of a visa.

Over the coming months, Canadian officials will continue to work with the European Commission and with the Romanian and Bulgarian governments on migration-related issues to lay the groundwork for a successful transition to visa-free travel.

Lifting the visa requirements for Romania and Bulgaria will mean visa-free travel to Canada for citizens of all EU member states.

 

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IRCC’S FORWARD PROJECTIONS FOR IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS

IRCC’S FORWARD PROJECTIONS FOR IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS.

Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has recently released a major announcement concerning expected changes to several immigration regulations.

Government departments periodically release Forward Regulatory Plans to outline their planned changes and actions. These releases are intended to inform the public and businesses, in order to enable stakeholders to plan for the future. Various objectives regarding the immigration issues were put forward, which are summarized below.

Changes to Repeal of the Live-in Caregiver Program
On November 30, 2014, the Government of Canada announced that the Live-In Caregiver Program would be suspended, and that two new programs – the Caring for Children Class and the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Class – would take its place. These replacement programs still provide a pathway to permanent residence. Meanwhile, individuals in Canada under the Live-in Caregiver Program may continue to be eligible for permanent residence, if their initial Live-in Caregiver work permit was based on a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) requested on or before November 30, 2014.

Changes to Business Immigration Programs
Following the termination of the federal Immigrant Investor and Entrepreneur Programs in 2014, the Forward Regulatory Plan states that a regulatory proposal will be developed to remove these programs from the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPA).

Changes to the International Mobility Program
The International Mobility Program (IMP) is a temporary foreign worker program run by IRCC, separate from the Temporary Foreign Worker program run by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). Its mandate is to facilitate the entry of LMIA-exempt foreign nationals in order to respond to Canada’s labour needs and advance national economic and cultural interests. The Forward Regulatory Plan proposes amending the IMP to exclude diplomatic missions and certain international organizations, from employer compliance criteria. The intention is to ease mobility between countries and comply with international agreements of which Canada is a part.

Changes to the Maximum Age in the Definition of Dependent Child
IRCC proposes to increase the maximum age of a dependent child accompanying a principal applicant on an application. Currently, unmarried children aged 19 and under may be included on an application. The intention is to enable more immigrants to bring their children with them, and reduce the need for multiple applications within a family. No definite age was proposed for the change.

Changes to Conditional Permanent Residence for New Sponsored Spouses
Currently, sponsored spouses who have been married for less than two years or who have no children with their spouse at the time of application are granted conditional permanent residence. Consequently, they are required to live with their spouse for two years following their arrival in Canada in order to maintain their permanent residence status. While no concrete changes were proposed in the “Forward regulatory plan: 2016-2018”, IRCC states that the proposal to change this requirement arose from concerns of the effect the requirement has on vulnerable spouses.

Changes to Support the Expansion of Eligibility for the Electronic Travel Authorization
In 2015, it was announced that certain categories of low-risk travellers from Brazil, Bulgaria, and Romania — countries whose citizens need Temporary Resident Visas (TRVs) in order to enter Canada — would be exempt from the TRV requirement. Regulatory changes are required to allow nationals of these three countries who have held a Canadian temporary resident visa in the last 10 years, or who hold a valid United States non-immigrant visa, to obtain an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) instead of a TRV for travel to Canada by air.
The Forward Regulatory Plan also states that changes to the information sharing policy with the United States are required, to account for a new immigration information sharing connection to confirm the validity of a visa.

Changes to Support the Expansion of Biometrics
Certain amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR) are required, in order to align with legislative changes to the IRPA that allow for the expansion of biometrics.

Changes to Support Five Country Conference Information Sharing
This objective intends to improve and support information sharing between the immigration authorities of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. (The fifth country in the Five Country Conference is the United States, which is not mentioned in this objective of the Forward Regulatory Plan). Amendments will be introduced to the IRPA to establish the scope of immigration information sharing — what may be shared, whose information may be shared, and how it may be shared.

Changes to Support Further Enhancements to the In-Canada Asylum System
The Forward Regulatory Plan states that amendments to the IRPR will be needed to support enhancements to the in-Canada asylum system. These enhancements are still being developed, and no concrete amendments were proposed in this objective.

Changes to Support the Electronic Administration/Processing of Applications under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
Following amendments made in 2015 to increase the use of electronic processing systems, the Forward Regulatory Plan defines anticipated changes that will enable IRCC and other authorities to use electronic tools and systems, including automated processing systems.
IRCC intends to make regulations that will:
• Specify details regarding the technology and systems to be used and matters relating to that system (e.g. the date/time when electronic documents or information are deemed to be sent or received);
• Require the use of an electronic system or means in certain circumstances (including an e-payment system), as well as to specify exceptions to that requirement (e.g. in cases of disability);
• Prescribe circumstances where the Minister may direct the use of alternate means to the use of the electronic system (e.g. in cases of natural disasters);
• Specify where a non-electronic application or other document should be sent.

Changes to Support Changes to the Citizenship Act
Following commitments from the Prime Minister and the Liberal Party of Canada to amend the Citizenship Act, the Forward Regulatory Plan states that a proposal will be developed to amend citizenship regulations to support changes to the Citizenship Act. Specifically, the Government committed to repeal provisions in the Citizenship Act that give the government the right to strip citizenship from dual nationals and to provide greater flexibility for applicants trying to meet the requirements for citizenship.

One might easily notice though, that important matters such as the Express Entry system and the Provincial Nominee Programs are not mentioned in this Forward Regulatory Plan. However, the intention to reshape their current structure was a substantial part of the electoral program heralded by the Liberals prior to coming into power, so we trust they will not be forgotten.

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GOVERNMENT OF CANADA: NO LMIA REQUIRED FOR FRANCOPHONE PROFESSIONALS AND TRADESPEOPLE SETTLING OUTSIDE QUEBEC.

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA: NO LMIA REQUIRED FOR FRANCOPHONE PROFESSIONALS AND TRADESPEOPLE SETTLING OUTSIDE QUEBEC.

On March 17, 2016, IRCC (Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada) has announced that, starting from June 1, 2016, the Mobilité Francophone stream will exempt employers from the Labour Market Impact Assessment process when they hire francophone workers in managerial, professional and technical/skilled trades occupations from abroad to work in francophone minority communities outside of Quebec.

We will keep you posted with details as soon as they emerge. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to contact us if you wish to hire or be hired using this tremendous opportunity that relieve the employers of the burden of proving that they tried to hire local personnel and from paying to Employment Canada $1000 for each temporary foreign worker.

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